Difference between revisions of "Cached thought"

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A '''cached thought''' is an answer that was arrived at by recalling a previously-computed conclusion, rather than performing the reasoning from scratch. Cached thoughts can be useful in saving computational resources at the cost of some memory load, and also at the risk of maintaining a belief long past the point when evidence should force an update. In particular, cached thoughts can result in a lack of creative approaches to problem-solving, as cached solutions may interfere with the formation of novel ones.
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What is generally called [[common sense]] is more or less a collection of cached thoughts.
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==See also==
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*[[Groupthink]], [[Information cascade]]
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*[[Status quo bias]]
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*[[Semantic stopsign]], [[Separate magisteria]]
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*[[Rationalist taboo]]
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==Main post==
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*[http://lesswrong.com/lw/k5/cached_thoughts/ Cached Thoughts]
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==Other posts==
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*[http://lesswrong.com/lw/k8/how_to_seem_and_be_deep/ How to Seem (and Be) Deep] — Just find ways of violating cached expectations.
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*[http://lesswrong.com/lw/ic/the_virtue_of_narrowness/ The Virtue of Narrowness] and [http://lesswrong.com/lw/k7/original_seeing/ Original Seeing] — One way to fight cached patterns of thought is to focus on precise concepts.
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*[http://lesswrong.com/lw/d2/cached_procrastination/ Cached Procrastination] by [[jimrandomh]]
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*[http://lesswrong.com/lw/4e/cached_selves/ Cached Selves] by [[Anna Salamon]] and [[Steve Rayhawk]]
  
 
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[[Category:Concepts]]

Latest revision as of 08:34, 26 June 2013

A cached thought is an answer that was arrived at by recalling a previously-computed conclusion, rather than performing the reasoning from scratch. Cached thoughts can be useful in saving computational resources at the cost of some memory load, and also at the risk of maintaining a belief long past the point when evidence should force an update. In particular, cached thoughts can result in a lack of creative approaches to problem-solving, as cached solutions may interfere with the formation of novel ones. What is generally called common sense is more or less a collection of cached thoughts.

See also

Main post

Other posts