Difference between revisions of "Egalitarianism"

From Lesswrongwiki
Jump to: navigation, search
m (oops, reversed meaning.)
Line 9: Line 9:
 
|[[Eliezer Yudkowsky]]|[http://www.overcomingbias.com/2007/03/tsuyoku_vs_the_.html Tsuyoku vs. the Egalitarian Instinct]}}
 
|[[Eliezer Yudkowsky]]|[http://www.overcomingbias.com/2007/03/tsuyoku_vs_the_.html Tsuyoku vs. the Egalitarian Instinct]}}
  
Dismissing egalitarianism is not opposed to [[humility]], even though from the [[signaling]] perspective it seems to be opposed to modesty.
+
Egalitarianism is the idea that everyone should be the same.  Equal in merit, equal in opportunity, equal in outcome, equal in morality, and equal in acheivement.  Dismissing egalitarianism is not opposed to [[humility]], even though from the [[signaling]] perspective it seems to be opposed to modesty.
  
 
==See Also==
 
==See Also==

Revision as of 07:21, 9 July 2009

Smallwikipedialogo.png
Wikipedia has an article about


If you can't admit to yourself that you've done better than others - or if you're ashamed of wanting to do better than others - then the median will forever be your concrete wall, the place where you stop moving forward. And what about people who are below average? Do you dare say you intend to do better than them? How prideful of you!

Maybe it's not healthy to pride yourself on doing better than someone else. Personally I've found it to be a useful motivator, despite my principles, and I'll take all the useful motivation I can get. Maybe that kind of competition is a zero-sum game, but then so is Go; it doesn't mean we should abolish that human activity, if people find it fun and it leads somewhere interesting.

But in any case, surely it isn't healthy to be ashamed of doing better.

Egalitarianism is the idea that everyone should be the same. Equal in merit, equal in opportunity, equal in outcome, equal in morality, and equal in acheivement. Dismissing egalitarianism is not opposed to humility, even though from the signaling perspective it seems to be opposed to modesty.

See Also

References

Overcoming Bias Articles